FNCA

Nuclear Security and Safeguards workshop

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Workshop


FNCA 2013 Workshop on Nuclear Security and Safeguards

Report of
FNCA 2013 Workshop on Nuclear Security and Safeguards Project


February 26 - 28, 2014
Beijing, China


Outline of Workshop

i) Date February 26th - 28th, 2014
ii) Venue Beijing, China
iii) Host Organization Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan (MEXT)
China Atomic Energy Agency (CAEA)
The State Nuclear Security Technology Center (SNSTC)
iv) Participants Total 21 representatives from 11 FNCA member countries, namely Bangladesh, China, Indonesia, Japan, Kazakhstan, ROK, Malaysia, Mongolia, The Philippines, Thailand and Vietnam, and IAEA.


Participants of the Workshop

The Workshop began with the opening remarks by Mr. XU Zhenhua, Assistant Director General of The State Nuclear Security Technology Center (SNSTC), and Mr. Masao SENZAKI as Project Leader of Japan.

The Workshop consisted of eight sessions. In Session 1 and 2, the FNCA member countries gave a presentation on country report which includes the developments and improvements since the last Workshop in nuclear security and safeguards implementation, nuclear security culture and capacity building. Session 3 was on human resource development. Three countries with Center of Excellence (COE), China, Japan and ROK, made presentations on the education programs and training courses available at their centers to strengthen nuclear security and nuclear non-proliferation. Presentations were followed by roundtable discussion among the participants. Session 4 presented the outcomes found from the International Conference on Nuclear Security organized by IAEA in July, 2013, and provided an introductory explanation on “2014-2017 Nuclear Security Plan” and IAEA’s roles for nuclear security. Session 5 were dedicated to good practices in enhancing nuclear security culture, in which the report from the 14th FNCA Ministerial Level Meeting and efforts by IAEA to promote nuclear security culture was presented. As a good practice, the nuclear security culture self-assessment conducted by BATAN, Indonesia, was introduced. In the round table discussion, Japan proposed to share FNCA member countries’ initiatives and best practices on nuclear security culture development through the FNCA website. In Session 6, country reports on current status of member countries were summarized. Session 7 was on safeguards. The presentations by Bangladesh and Indonesia on the state-level approach in their countries were provided. A round table discussion on the nuclear 3S (safeguards, security and safety) was conducted in Session 8.

The workshop encouraged participating countries to become more aware of the importance of nuclear security and safeguards, sharing information on the improvement and development in nuclear security and safeguards implementation in each participating country, and promoting capacity building for nuclear security and safeguards.
The workshop also reminded participating country of the importance of enhancing nuclear security and safeguards regimes.



Summary of
FNCA 2013 Workshop on Nuclear Security and Safeguards Project


February 26 - 28, 2014
Beijing, China


1) Outline of Workshop

i) Date February 26th - 28th, 2014
ii) Venue Beijing, China
iii) Host Organization Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan (MEXT)
China Atomic Energy Agency (CAEA)
The State Nuclear Security Technology Center (SNSTC)
iv) Participants Total 21 representatives from 11 FNCA member countries, namely Bangladesh, China, Indonesia, Japan, Kazakhstan, ROK, Malaysia, Mongolia, The Philippines, Thailand and Vietnam, and IAEA.

Session 1&2: Country Report Summary
Moderator: ROK and Indonesia
Total 11 FNCA member countries (Bangladesh, China, Indonesia, Japan, Kazakhstan, Malaysia, Mongolia, Philippines, ROK, Thailand, Vietnam) gave a presentation on country report which includes the developments and improvements since the last Workshop in nuclear security and safeguards implementation, nuclear security culture and capacity building.
All countries have close cooperation with international or regional organizations and other countries to strengthen safeguards and security capacity.
Almost all the countries have taken initiatives to develop human resources on nuclear security and safeguards by organizing training courses, seminars, and workshops, with the cooperation of IAEA and other countries.
Details of the country report are covered in Session 6.

Session 3: Round Table Discussion on Human Resource Development
Moderator: The Philippines
Presentations by ROK, China and Japan
Session 3 covers the discussion on Human Resource Development. Three countries with Center of Excellence (COE), ROK, Japan and China, made presentations on the education programs and training courses available at their centers to strengthen nuclear security and nuclear non-proliferation. Presentations by three countries were followed by roundtable discussion among the participants.

The summary of each presentation is as follows:
The International Nuclear Non-proliferation and Security Academy (INSA) of ROK was established in February 19, 2014, and it will start conducting the Basic Courses on Nuclear Security, Safeguards and Export Control to support newcomer countries in strengthening their nuclear security and non-proliferation infrastructures.
The Integrated Support Center for Nuclear Nonproliferation and Nuclear Security (ISCN) of Japan has been conducting courses on Nuclear Security, Safeguards and State System of Accounting for and Control of nuclear material (SSAC) and International Non-proliferation Framework.
State Nuclear Security Technology Center (SNSTC) of China was established in November 2011. The COE will be established under the SNSTC in 2015, and it is now under construction. Its main functions will be international cooperation, education and training, Advanced Technology demonstration and testing and Certification.

The summary of the discussion is as follows:
The three COEs will exchange information with each other's training courses and mutually invites lecturers and observers to training courses.
Generally, establishment of a COE will take time. It will depend on the availability of project funding, establishment of procedures and technical specifications. Chinese side pointed out that if resources were available, three years might be enough to establish a COE.
Target audience of the three COEs for their international education and training on nuclear security and safeguards courses are mainly countries in Asia and Pacific Region, especially the nuclear energy development countries and those establishing their legal framework and infrastructure.
These COEs also provide domestic training courses. In China, students will be trained through training courses which are introduced into the university's curriculum.
Specific course on Nuclear Security Culture can be conducted for government officials involved in nuclear security.
There was a suggestion that experts from other Asian countries with long experience in nuclear security, be invited as lecturers to the training courses of three COEs and Mr. Senzaki of Japan welcomed the suggestion.

Session 4: Nuclear Security
Moderator: Bangladesh
Presentation by IAEA

The summary of the presentation is as follows:
In session 4, Mr. Fumitaka Watanabe, Division of Nuclear Security of the IAEA gave presentation about the outcomes found from the first ever International Conference on Nuclear Security organized by the IAEA from 1-5 July 2013. Mr. Watanabe introduced the recommendations drawn from the ministerial level meetings towards enhancing global nuclear security activities through allocating more funds, hosting IPPAS missions, organizing outreach seminars, workshops and related events. In addition to the ministerial level meetings, Mr. Watanabe also added hundreds of scientific papers and posters were presented in several parallel technical sessions. About 1300 participants from 125 member states participated in this grand conference. Mr. Watanabe reported that every member state agreed to give priority in promoting the nuclear security culture in his or her organizations and IAEA should give more focus on achieving sustainable nuclear security systems by developing more technical experts.
Mr. Watanabe also discussed the contributions received from the nuclear security plan 2010-2013 by the member states and IAEA. The on-going nuclear security plan 2014-2017 is also presented in highlighting the present and future activities.

Session 5: Round Table Discussion on Good Practices in enhancing Nuclear Security Culture
Moderator: Malaysia
Presentations by Japan and IAEA

The summary of each presentation is as follows:
Report from 14th FNCA Ministerial Level Meeting (9 Dec. 2013, Tokyo Japan) : Japan
Ministers from 12 FNCA member countries attended the meeting. There were three major issues among the meeting agenda; the status of Fukushima accident, effective implementation of the project outcomes to member countries, and nuclear security culture development. The details are as follows:

a. Fukushima Status
Fukushima Daiichi is in a stable condition. No significant radiation reading being detected in the surrounding environment. The results of 84 sampling points showed that the level was much lower than the standard for drinking water by WHO. Road map has been shown up-to 40 years for decommissioning.
b. Project Status
Issues on effective implementation of project outcomes in some fields of radiation use were reported.
c. Nuclear Security Culture Development
The IAEA plays a major role in this area. Indonesia conducted pilot self-assessment project for BATAN research reactor personnel. 624 employees participated in this research. ISCN will work together with the IAEA to offer training in Nuclear Security Culture for the regional participants. Overall the Ministerial Meeting emphasized the importance of Human Resource Development.

Effort to promote Nuclear security culture: IAEA
The IAEA makes a great effort to promote nuclear security culture. Human factor is the key in nuclear security. Management system of an organization and leadership/personnel behavior are critical elements of enhancing nuclear security culture.
The IAEA General Conference identified training and education as one of the most important factors. It was also mentioned in the conference that political recognition and support were needed. Member states are urged to give due priority for implementation of NSS 13 (INFCIRC/225/Rev. 5) and enhancement of nuclear security.
The responsibility for establishment, implementation and maintenance of a nuclear security regime rests entirely with a State. The IAEA is currently producing two technical guides on nuclear security culture: a guide for self-assessment and a guide for enhancing nuclear security culture. The IAEA recommends that self-assessment to be done continuously and strong commitments from the senior managements are very important. The IAEA is considering establishing database or library for nuclear security culture case study in the future. Bulgaria is conducting self-assessment, and Hungary is considering as well. Malaysia is considering conducting self-assessment at a medical facility.

Result for BATAN self-assessment
In July 2010, BATAN senior level decided to conduct a nuclear security culture self-assessment. The methodology involved is survey and interview. For BATAN, 624 staff members have been surveyed and 128 have been interviewed. The assessment team consists of 41 people. Nuclear security culture self-assessment contains confidential information so that it should be done by inner members rather than having a third party. Result of the BATAN self-assessment project was reported at the IAEA International Nuclear Security Conference in July 2013.

The summary of the discussion is as follows:
Confirmation of Discussion Points : Japan
Resolution on 14th FNCA Ministerial Level Meeting and Chairman's statement were reaffirmed. ISCN will organize a regional training course co-hosted by the IAEA in November 2014. Japan will continuously support FNCA member countries through the activities of ISCN. Japan also proposes to share FNCA member countries' initiatives and best practices on nuclear security culture development through the FNCA website. Sample template of the information sharing form was introduced and proposed to include the form into the country report.

Participants feed-back:
a. Safety and security harmonization is needed to be considered. Nuclear Security culture is not only for the operator but also for all the relevant agencies (customs, police, intelligence etc.)
b. A meeting at a higher level of management should be organized solely on the nuclear security and non-proliferation in order to raise political priority to the issues.
c. The template should include not just the list of activities but the outcome/results of activities are most important to share.

Session 6: Country Report Summary:
Presenter: Japan

1. Independence of Regulatory Authority
Bangladesh established a new regulatory authority which is semi-independent under FNCA definition.
2. Safeguards: Status of International Legal Instruments
No update.
3. Safeguards: Improvements in Safeguards Implementation
Significant improvements were observed in most of the countries including introduction of new law and regulations, strengthening international cooperation, clear plan for future activities, etc.
4. Security: Status of International Legal Instruments
Indonesia ratified ICSANT.
5. Security: Improvements in Nuclear Security Implementation
Steady progress in most of the countries: implementation/drafting of new laws and regulations, major upgrade of PP systems, enhanced international cooperation, etc.
6. Nuclear Security Culture
Some countries hosted seminars/workshops by their own or with other initiatives, and some countries developed guideline on security culture.
7. Capacity Building
ROK launched INSA. China and Kazakhstan's COEs are under construction. Indonesia is considering establishing a COE (Iconsep), and Vietnam is also considering establishing a technical support center in the near future.

Session 7: Safeguards: State-Level Approach Implementation
Moderator: Vietnam
Presentations by Bangladesh and Indonesia

The summary of each presentation is as follows:
Safeguards State Level Approach in Bangladesh: Bangladesh
Regarding nuclear material and associated facilities, Bangladesh has one research reactor and a radioactive waste management unit. Depleted uranium is used for shielding material in radiotherapy at hospitals. The accounting records are maintained at the facility.
In regard to activities on nuclear safeguards and infrastructure development, in November 2011, Bangladesh signed a nuclear cooperation agreement with Russia for setting up two nuclear power plants. In December 2006, the IAEA approved the State Level Approach for Bangladesh and entered into Integrated Safeguards from January 2007.

Safeguards State Level Approach in Indonesia: Indonesia
Indonesia has three research reactors owned by BATAN. Inspection of LOFs is conducted 0.25 probability of random selection per year. After the Additional Protocol entered into force in September1999, the initial declaration was submitted to the IAEA in March 2000. Indonesia has entered into State level Approach SG in August 2003. Indonesia conducts inspections at nuclear facilities on a regular basis.

Discussions were made on experiences from both countries, such as the number of IAEA inspection reduced for nuclear facilities.

Session 8: Roundtable discussion on 3S (safety, safeguards, and security)
Moderator: Thailand
Presentations by China, Japan and IAEA

The summary of each presentation is as follows:
China: National effort for good management of 3S
China presented the good management of 3S between the different national competent authorities. China Atomic Energy Authority (CAEA) is responsible for Safeguards and Security. Responsibility for nuclear and radiation safety of civilian nuclear facility is under National Nuclear Safety Administration (NNSA). China joined the important international legal frameworks such as CNS, AP, CPPNM, etc. China is fully committed to nuclear non-proliferation and countering terrorism threat, and actively working with the international community. As energy demands constantly increasing, having sufficient number and qualified personnel are big challenges for China.

Japan: Some Orientation Towards Safety-Security Upgrade for Sustainable Use of Nuclear Energy
Japan proposed the integrated approach for upgrading safety and security. The lessons learned from nuclear incident/accident caused by external hazards, for example, the Fukushima Daiichi accident, could be applied, in common objectives and scheme of defense-in-depth concept, to security measures as well. Such an integrated approach to designing a new nuclear power plant system will promote effectively harmonized performance of both safety and security.

IAEA: Overview of the "Use of Nuclear Material Accounting and Control for Nuclear Security Purpose at facilities" discussed in IAEA
IAEA presented the importance of Nuclear Material Accounting and Control (NMAC) not only for safeguards propose but also for nuclear security. NMAC contributes to detect unauthorized removal of materials by insiders or outsiders. However, it is important to recognize that time frame for inventory is different for safeguards purpose and security purpose. The IAEA is going to publish an implementation guide on NMAC for security, and the Agency is also drafting a technical guide.

The summary of the discussion is as follows:
All the presentations showed the concept of the interaction of 3S and 2S&2S. For NMAC, not only the time frame for inventory but also the amount of materials for observation is different in safeguards and security.

Action Plan for 2014
For nuclear security and Safeguards
- To post the "Summary of Country Reports of Nuclear Security and Safeguards" on the FNCA websites
For nuclear 3S (safety, safeguards, and security)*remaining action item for 2013
- To post the "Table of the information on Regulatory Authorities for Nuclear 3S"on the FNCA website
For nuclear security culture
- Japan to host a regional training course on nuclear security with IAEA in November 2014
- To post the "Table of the information on Nuclear Security Culture (tentative)" on the FNCA website



Program of
FNCA 2013 Workshop on Nuclear Security and Safeguards Project


February 26 - 28, 2014
Beijing, China


Day 1: 26 February 2014, Wednesday

9:30-10:00 Opening Remarks
- Mr. XU Zhenhua, Assistant Director General, SNSTC
- Mr. Masao SENZAKI, Project Leader of Japan
10:00-10:35 Introduction of Members, Adoption of the Agenda, Group Photo
10:35-10:55 Coffee Break
11:05-12:05 Session 1: Country Reports
- Bangladesh
- Indonesia
- Japan
12:05-13:35 Lunch Break
13:35-15:20 Session 2: Country Reports
- Kazakhstan
- Malaysia
- Mongolia
- Republic of Korea (ROK)
- The Philippines
- Thailand
- Vietnam
15:20-15:40 Coffee Break
15:40-16:50 Session 3: Round Table Discussion on Human Resource Development
Presentation: China, Japan, ROK
- Briefing on the Center of Excellences from China, Japan and ROK
(Mr. XU Zhenhua, SNSTC)
(Mr. Masao SENZAKI, Project Leader of Japan)
(Mr. Donghuk LIM, KINAC)

Day 2: 27 February 2014, Thursday

9:30-10:10 Session 4: Nuclear Security
Presentation: IAEA
- Report from the International Conference on Nuclear Security (1-5 July, 2013)
- An introductory explanation on "2014-2017 Nuclear Security Plan" and IAEA's roles for nuclear security
(Mr. Fumitaka WATANABE, IAEA)
10:10-10:30 Coffee Break
10:30-12:30 Session 5: Round Table Discussion on Good Practices in enhancing Nuclear
Security Culture
Presentation: Japan, IAEA
- Report from the 14th FNCA Ministerial Level Meeting
Prof. Tomoaki WADA, FNCA Japan Advisor)
- Effort to promote nuclear security culture
(Mr. Fumitaka WATANABE, IAEA)
12:30-14:00 Lunch Break
14:00-14:20 Session 6: Country Report Summary
(Ms. Naoko NORO, JAEA)
14:20-15:00 Session 7: Safeguards: State-Level Approach Implementation
Presentations: Bangladesh, Indonesia
- State-level approach in Bangladesh
(Dr. Md.Shafiqul ISLAM, BAEC)
- State-level approach in Indonesia
(Ms. Susilaningsih Medi LESTARI, BAPETEN)
15:00-15:20 Coffee Break
15:20-16:50

Session 8: Round Table Discussion on 3S (safety, safeguards, and security)
Presentations: China, Japan, IAEA
- National effort for good management of 3S
(Mr. XU Zhenhua, SNSTC)
- Some orientation towards safety-security upgrade for sustainable use of nuclear energy
(Mr. Nobuyuki NONAKA, JAEA)
- Overview of the "Use of Nuclear Material Accounting and Control for nuclear security purposes at facilities" discussed in the IAEA
(Mr. Fumitaka WATANABE. IAEA)


Day 3: 28 February 2014, Friday

10:00-12:00 Session 9: Concluding Session
Lead Speech: Mr. Masao SENZAKI (Project Leader of Japan)
- Summary and conclusions
12:00-12:20 Closing Remarks


Participants List of
FNCA 2013 Workshop on Nuclear Security and Safeguards Project


February 26 - 28, 2014
Beijing, China


Bangladesh
Md.Shafiqul ISLAM
Principal Engineer
Nuclear Safety, Security and Safeguards Division
Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission (BAEC)

China
Mr. XU Zhenhua
Assistant Director General
The State Nuclear Security Technology Center (SNSTC)

Mr. QIU Chunhua
Engineer
The State Nuclear Security Technology Center (SNSTC)

Mr. ZHOU Zhibo
Engineer
The State Nuclear Security Technology Center (SNSTC)

Mr. LIU Xinyuan
The State Nuclear Security Technology Center (SNSTC)

Indonesia
Ms. Susilaningsih Medi LESTARI
Deputy Director for Safeguards Inspection
Nuclear Energy Regulatory Agency (BAPETEN)

Japan
Mr. Masao SENZAKI
Director
Integrated Support Center for Nuclear Nonproliferation and Nuclear Safety
Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA)

Prof. Tomoaki WADA
FNCA Japan Advisor
Professor, President's office, Tokyo University of Science

Mr. Wataru TODOROKI
First Secretary
Embassy of Japan in China

Mr.Nobuyuki NONAKA
Integrated Support Center for Nuclear Nonproliferation and Nuclear Safety
Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA)

Ms. Yuki MATSUDA
Integrated Support Center for Nuclear Nonproliferation and Nuclear Safety
Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA)

Ms. Naoko NORO
Integrated Support Center for Nuclear Nonproliferation and Nuclear Safety
Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA)

Ms. Atsuko TAKANO
International Affairs and Research Department
Nuclear Safety Research Association (NSRA)

IAEA
Mr. Fumitaka WATANABE
Nuclear Security Officer
Nuclear Security of Materials and Facilities Section, Division of Nuclear Security
Department of Nuclear Safety and Security
International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)

Kazakhstan
Mr. BEREZIN Sergey Anatolievich
Deputy Director General of the National Nuclear Center of the Republic of Kazakhstan

Republic of Korea
Mr. Donghuk LIM
Senior Researcher
Nonproliferation Policy and Planning Division
Korea Institute of Nuclear Nonproliferation and Control (KINAC)

Malaysia
Mr. Hafids Bin ATTAN
Assistant Director
Atomic Energy Licensing Board (AELB)

Mongolia
Dr. Tseren DAMDINSUREN
Deputy Director General
Nuclear Energy Agency of Mongolia

The Philippines
Ms. Sylvia Silva BUSINE
Senior Science Research Specialist
Philippine Nuclear Research Institute (PNRI)

Thailand
Ms. Siriratana BIRAMONTRI
Director of Bureau of Technical Support for Safety Regulation
Office of Atoms For Peace (OAP)

Viet Nam
Dr. NGUYEN Nu Hoai Vi
Director of Nuclear Control Division
Vietnam Agency for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (VARANS)


Forum for Nuclear Cooperation in Asia