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9th March 2022, Online
Summary Report
Program
List of Participants
Presentations

3rd-4th March 2021, Online
Summary Report
Program
List of Participants
Presentations

Mar 7th 2019, Japan
Summary Report
Program
List of Participants
Presentations

Mar 23th 2018, Japan
Summary Report
Program
List of Participants
Presentations

Mar 8-9th 2017, Japan
Summary Report
Program
List of Participants

Mar 10th 2016, Japan
Summary Report
Program
List of Participants

"Study Panel on the Approaches toward Infrastructure Development for Nuclear Power" (2009-)
6th: Aug 26th -27th 2014, Vietnam
Summary Report
Program
List of Participants

5th: Aug 22th - 23th 2013, Japan
Summary Report
Program
List of Participants

4th: Jul 26th - 27th 2012, Thailand
Summary Report
Program
List of Participants

3rd: Jul 5th - 6th 2011, Indonesia
Summary Report
Program
List of Participants

2nd: Jul 1st - 2nd 2010, Korea
Summary Report
Program
List of Participants

1st: Jul 30th 31st 2009, Tokyo
Summary Report
Program
List of Participants


"Study Panel for Cooperation in the Field of Nuclear Energy in Asia" (2007-2008)
2nd: Sep 1st - 2nd 2008, Tokyo
Summary Report
Program
List of Participants

1st: Oct 30th - 31st 2007, Tokyo
Summary Report
Program
List of Participants


"Role of Nuclear Energy for Sustainable Development in Asia" (2004-2006)
3rd: Nov 1st - 2nd 2006, Tsuruga
Summary Report
Program
List of Participants

2nd: Jan 25th - 26th 2006, Tokyo
Summary Report
Program

1st: Oct 20th - 21st 2004, Tokyo
Summary Report
Program
 


Forum for Nuclear Cooperation in Asia (FNCA)
“FNCA 2022 Study Panel”

Participants Photo

The 2022 Study Panel of Forum for Nuclear Cooperation in Asia (FNCA) was held online on 9th March 2022, hosted by Cabinet Office of Japan (CAO) and Japan Atomic Energy Commission (JAEC). The Panel was attended by representatives from 11 FNCA member countries (Australia, Bangladesh, China, Indonesia, Japan, Kazakhstan, Malaysia, Mongolia, the Philippines, Thailand and Vietnam) as well as the invited speakers from the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), The Swedish National Council for Nuclear Waste and Agency for Natural Resources and Energy, Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI) from Japan.

1. Background of Study Panel
With the growing concern over the issues of energy security and global warming in the member countries, the Panel was started in 2004 to serve as a forum to discuss the roles and challenges of nuclear power generation. Since then, the Panel has continued contributing to the exchanging and sharing of information among the member countries.
With growing awareness of the importance of nuclear energy application, through recent FNCA meetings, the member countries have recognized the importance of the appropriate infrastructure development of legal systems and human resources for nuclear power.
From 2017 to 2019, the Panels focused on legal affairs with respect to the use of nuclear power and technology, and the member countries have shared common interest and deepened their understanding of related legal issues in collaboration with well-informed international organizations.
In 2021, the Panel moved on to a different field of interest and the timely topics on the nuclear isotopic technology and climate change.
In the 22nd Senior Officials Meeting in June 2021, the topic on building public trust on nuclear science and technology - stakeholder involvement was adopted for the Study Panel 2022.

2. Objectives of 2022 Study Panel
The Study Panel aims at sharing knowledge, good practices and experiences to promote the safe and peaceful use of nuclear science and technology among the member countries.

3. Summary of 2022 Study Panel (lectures, questions and answers)

(1) Key-note speech
 

1) "NEA's Activities on Stakeholder Trust and Engagement"
Mr. Greg LAMARRE, Head of the Division of Radiological Protection, and Human Aspects of Nuclear Safety, OECD/NEA
NEA has continued working on the concepts of stakeholder trust, engagement and communication for many years, and discussed and deepened understanding with its member countries through a variety of workshops based on the shared vision that trust building is essential for successful public communication.
As a next attempt, NEA will hold "3rd NEA Stakeholder Involvement Workshop on Optimisation in Decision-Making" in 2022 - 2023. The objectives of the workshop are to improve the common and practical understanding of what optimisation in decision-making means for policy-makers and regulators, and to identify the foundation of a generic multidimensional framework to support the optimisation process for a challenging agenda.
Recently, NEA has conducted a public survey on the characteristics and attributes of a trusted nuclear regulator for public and stakeholders in 2021. Based on the result of survey, NEA Green Booklet will be published as a practical guide for regulators on how to build and maintain trust with stakeholders. NEA will continue to work further on stakeholder engagement and building trust as important subjects.
In the question and answer session, the following topics were raised:
Method of public survey and application of results.

   
  2) "Stakeholder Involvement"
Prof. UESAKA Mitsuru, Chairman of JAEC
A lot of Japanese people continuously have negative images for nuclear: "dangerous" or "worrying", etc.
To deepen an understanding of nuclear science and technology, evidence-based information system and excellent research system as well as communication activities making use of interactive dialogue, public relations and media: stakeholder involvement need to be provided. According to the JAEC's view stated in 2016, there are a lot of issues to be solved on the information system in nuclear fields, and nuclear-related organizations should develop information systems based on objective evidence and facts. JAEC pointed out the importance of stakeholder involvement in the nuclear fields again and summarised the basic concept in 2018.
In terms of the stakeholder activity in Japan, JAEC focused on the making of eye-friendly and easy-to-understand White Paper on Nuclear Energy 2020, and worked on its dissemination both domestically and internationally. Public organizations have made efforts to enhance information sharing and communication by holding symposiums and interactive seminars, distributing timely articles on websites and operating hands-on information centers. Japan Atomic Industrial Forum (JAIF) has implemented interactive communication activities to promote a better understanding of nuclear science and technology targeting at next generations and women. Electric power companies have implemented cooperation activities with the local communities at the location of nuclear power stations (NPS) to promote their understanding.
The Federation of Electric Power Companies of Japan (FEPC) is operating a website of "ENE-LEARNING" for education of energy and environment targeting junior high school students.
In the question and answer session, the following topics were raised:
Change of public awareness after the stakeholder activities; approach to the opponents of NPS; cultural differences in the region of NPS.

(2) Stakeholder Involvement related to Radioactive Waste Management
 

1) "Participation in Sweden with focus on the process for a repository for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) 1977 - 2090 (?) History and thoughts forward"

  Ms. Johanna SWEDIN, scientific secretary in the secretariat for the Swedish National Council for Nuclear Waste
Sweden had conducted site selection process for 30 years from 1977 to 2009. The Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) conducted site investigations with geological screening from 1977, which, however, caused a lot of protests, and suffered a setback. They reconsidered siting strategy and conducted feasibility studies with new approach that local acceptability was prioritized as a primary principle. The site investigations had been conducted in two municipalities: Osthammar and Oskarshamn from 2002 to 2007, and Forsmark of Osthammar was chosen for the repository in 2009. In 2011, SKB began parallel licensing processes for a final repository for spent nuclear fuel in Forsmark and an encapsulation plant in Oskarshamn, according to the Environmental Code and the Nuclear Activities Act. They received conditional permission from the government under the Environmental Code and the Nuclear Activities Act on January 27th, 2022. Both review processes had been rather open and the applications had been circulated for review and comments through other experts and organizations than those concerned and the general public several times. The applications were also approved by municipalities: Osthammar in 2020 and Oskarshamn in 2018 individually. The Swedish Environmental Protection Agency coordinated consultations with neighbor countries in 2008, 2016 and 2021, according to Espoo Convention. Important factors for the process are the relatively high amount of trust of the Swedes for the authorities, transparency of information, long-standing works of SKB on RD&D programme and dialogue with the general public, and so on.
Osthammar will go from siting to hosting and it will take for at least further 70 years. The Swedish National Council for Nuclear Waste believes that broad participation by the stakeholders in the long process even after a decision is important. Keeping confidence in the implementer and stakeholder involvement in nuclear science and technology are important to build public trust, and in this case, they contributed to rapid process of site selection.
In the question and answer session, the following topics were raised:
Public survey; public incentive to municipalities

2) "Current Situation of Final Disposal of High-Level Radioactive Waste in Japan"
Mr. SHIMOHORI Tomokazu, Director, Radioactive Waste Management Policy Division, Agency for Natural Resources and Energy, Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry
Nuclear Waste Management Organization (NUMO) was established in accordance with the Designated Radioactive Waste Final Disposal Act enacted in 2000, and NUMO started open solicitation for all municipalities to apply for an investigation. According to the basic policy in 2015, the final disposal of high-level radioactive wastes is recognized as an issue to be resolved by the present generation in order not to putting off their responsibility to future generation and the government should play a proactive role in resolving the issue. In 2017, the government published Nationwide Map of Scientific Features. Taking this opportunity, the government has worked on nationwide public dialogues to deepen understanding of the final disposal, while experiences and knowledge about public understanding have been discussed and shared as a common challenge with other nuclear power user countries. In November 2020, NUMO started Literature Survey in Kamoenai village and Suttu town, Hokkaido. METI and NUMO is making efforts to promote public dialogues through "Place for Dialogue" in which local residents can promote a better understanding of the deep geological repository (DGR) project and local development plan, while continuing the public dialogues throughout the nation to make more municipalities to have interests in the final disposal project and to accept literature survey. In addition, Japan is making efforts to enhance the reliability of final disposal project through international collaboration including holding workshops and promoting joint research projects utilizing the Horonobe Underground Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA).
In the question and answer session, the following topics were raised:
Public incentives to municipalities; participation after completion of final repository; level of public understanding of the local residents for final repository; case of Toyo town; importance of sincere and courteous communication.

(3) Stakeholder involvement relating to Nuclear Facilities including power stations -National perspectives
 

1) "Irradiation Facilities of the OPAL Reactor"

  Mr. Matt PARKER, Utilization Manager, ANSTO
The Open Pool Australian Light Water (OPAL) reactor is a 20MW multi-purpose research reactor utilizing for health, science, and industry application of neutron. For health, medical isotopes are produced and used locally and exported to other countries. For science, neutron scattering has one of the largest stakeholders in ANSTO and facilities are some of the best in the world and available for application of international researchers. For industry, ANSTO is one of the world largest suppliers in terms of the neutron transmutation doping (NTD) for semiconductor silicon. The share was increasing in the market even during COVID-19 pandemic over the last year, and now it is over 50% of world supply. OPAL has various irradiation facilities; bulk irradiation facilities producing Iridium 192 (192Ir) for industry use, and Lutetium 177 (177Lu), Molybdenum 99(99Mo) and Iodine 131 (131I) for medical isotopes; long residence time irradiation facilities producing Chromium 51 (51Cr), Samarium 153 (153Sm) for medical isotopes and utilizing geological samples for mining research; short residence time irradiation facilities for neutron activation analysis; large volume irradiation facilities for NSD of single crystal silicon; hot sells; and so on. In terms of stakeholder engagement and reactor schedule, since OPAL has many irradiation facilities and features, ANSTO responds to demands from a broad community of stakeholders across the scientific, medical and industrial sectors. ANSTO is making efforts on the efficient and safe operation of OPAL in order to optimize and comply with the demands of many stakeholders. Minimum number and period of shutdowns for maintenance and efficient execution of the asset management are required. ANSTO co-ordinates with other producers to decide operating schedule especially for 99Mo production.
In the question and answer session, the following topics were raised:
Perspective of the world supply of 99Mo.

2) "Community Engagement on Nuclear Power Station Preparation"
Dr. Adipurwa MUSLICH, Public Communication Bureau, National Research and Innovation Agency (BRIN)
Indonesia has been working on the stakeholder activities for introduction of first NPS. Communication with stakeholders needs to be carried out in three phases: beginning of communication, public awareness, establishment of national regulation and nuclear agency based on governments' mandate in phase 1, and intense communication with stakeholders associated with the development of NPS project, public acceptance and establishment of NPS owner or mandated organization in phase 2 and 3. In phase 1, social research was conducted in West Kalimantan in 2020 as a stake holder mapping program to identify local decision makers and opinion leaders. We analyzed on classification of stakeholders according to tribe, language and religion etc. , and mutuality of influence to decision making in each classification. We made effective treatment plans and implemented program suitable for West Kalimantan from the findings of these studies. From results of these activities, the key points were identified, i. e. effective strategies based on the stakeholder analysis; appropriate timing and information; producing guides for field technical officers/researchers to build synchronic public information. Currently the government is preparing to establish Nuclear Energy Programme Implementing Organization (NEPIO) and they will work on community development, public survey to establish a database, dissemination through media and so on in future.
In the question and answer session, the following topics were raised:
How to measure the effectiveness of stakeholders' influence.

3) "Stakeholders Involvement in Strengthening the Capability of Radiation Processing Facilities"
Mr. Ahsanulkhaliqin B. Abdul WAHAB, Senior Research Officer, Malaysian Nuclear Agency
The radiation processing facilities of the Malaysian Nuclear Agency play important roles in the industry of Malaysia and usage of the facilities and research results are being expanded into various industries. SINAGAMA is a multi-purpose gamma irradiation facility for sterilization of medical products and food. ALURTRON provides electron beam radiation services for wire, tube, and semiconductors. RAYMINTEX is a gamma irradiation facility for radiation vulcanization of natural rubber latex. SINAGAMA has a lot of limitations as a public facility including cost of cobalt replenishment, marketing of services, maintenance, human resources and so on. The Malaysian Nuclear Agency embarked on a Public-Private Partnership in 2013, which was 15-year project designed to address the shortcomings and ensure un-disrupted services. The cobalt has been replenished for 3 times through the project and service availability reached at 90 - 95% on average. The result of the customer satisfaction study showed high degree of satisfaction, although there were impacts of COVID-19 pandemic. Most of the major facilities including SINAGAMA and RAYMINTEX are certified to ISO 2230 Business Continuality Management System (BCMS), in order to ensure stable services. Business Continuality Plan (BCP) system was established to secure backup system to utilize alternative site during unpredictable shutdown. Stakeholder involvement is very important and effective to identify issues on strengthening the capability of radiation processing facilities. The involvement of regulators that beyond their roles is very much needed of which they should also act as advisor and facilitator to the industries and projects.

4) "Draft Communication Strategy 2022 for RNPP, Bangladesh January - December 2022"
Dr. Md. Khurshed ALAM, Director, Scientific Information Division, Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission (BAEC)
The goals of the communication strategy for Rooppur Nuclear Power Plant (RNPP) are: 1) Public education about nuclear energy and nuclear safety among the residents of Bangladesh and those of RNPP region, 2) Building public confidence in nuclear power and the national nuclear program, and 3) Building public interest in non-energy nuclear applications.
Bangladesh is implementing one of the biggest projects in its history - the construction of first NPP in Rooppur, with various partners. NPP is indispensable for successful social and economic development of Bangladesh, and it is indispensable to raise public awareness about the benefits of nuclear power to convince the masses for successful implementation of the nuclear program in Bangladesh. Communication activities are aimed to continue the active distribution of information, more awareness work with media, interaction with experts, stakeholders, general public and local residents, and especially they have to be proactive in raising awareness about the smooth and timely implementation of the project with a focus on the local residents. In addition, with the rapid progress of the plant, there is rising concern around safety and environment issues. Special attention should be paid to communication for safety of the NPP both for people and the environment, focusing on sustainability and ecological benefits of nuclear technology.
In the question and answer session, the following topics were raised:
Progress of the RNPP; site selection of the next NPP

4. Chairman's Note

At the end of the meeting, the Chairman made the following closing remarks

  • The invaluable knowledge and experiences presented by two guest speakers and five member countries were all informative and of great advantages for those who are engaged in the planning and implementation of the nuclear energy programme. The exchange of views among the participants also contributed to deepening our understanding. I also believe that despite an on-line conference, the network built among the participants will be a precious asset for our future activities.
  • There is no common universal model of effective Stakeholder Involvement which guarantees the success of nuclear projects, since decision-making processes of each country vary depending on the difference of culture, history, social context and institutional structures. I've learnt, however that successful sociopolitical Stakeholder Involvement requires, above all things, an adequate, open and sufficient dialogue among stakeholders, and the authorities concerned should be competent and credible. These are the bottom line when we discuss "the Stake holder Involvement.
  • Building on that understandings, long-term strategy and handmade planning should be crafted on a case by case basis considering each unique situation. I felt that regaining trust from the public regarding nuclear programme is not easy at all but requires pains-taking efforts under clear future vision and prospect.
  • I believe that any decision on nuclear issues should be based on scientific facts and understandings. Therefore, in order to build confidence on nuclear science, it is imperative to disseminate the precise knowledge and information of nuclear science among the stakeholders and public through general education curriculum. This will also be one of the crucial building blocks for building an architecture called "Stakeholder Involvement" in the nuclear business.


Forum for Nuclear Cooperation in Asia (FNCA)
“FNCA 2022 Study Panel”
Programme

Date: 9 March 2021
Venue: Online
Organized by: Cabinet Office (CAO) Government of Japan
Japan Atomic Energy Committee (JAEC)
Chair Mr. SANO Toshio, Commissioner of JAEC
Theme "Building public trust on nuclear science and technology (Stakeholder Involvement)"

Wednesday, 9 March *JST
16:00 - 16:15

Session 1: Opening *OPEN TO PRESS
Chair: Mr. SANO Toshio, Commissioner of JAEC

  1. Opening Remarks
  2. Self-introduction of Participants
  3. Confirmation of Agenda
 
16:15 - 17:05

Session 2: Keynote Speeches (50 min) *OPEN TO PRESS
Chair: Mr. SANO Toshio, Commissioner of JAEC

  1. "NEA's Activities on Stakeholder Trust and Engagement"
    Mr. Greg LAMARRE, Head of the Division of Radiological Protection and Human Aspects of Nuclear Safety, OECD/NEA
  2. "Stakeholder Involvement"
    Prof. UESAKA Mitsuru, Chairman of JAEC
   
17:05 - 17:50 Session 3, Stakeholder Involvement related to Radioactive Waste Management (45 min)
Chair: Prof. NAKANISHI Tomoko, Commissioner of JAEC
Case Study-1: Sweden's case (15min+Q&A 7min)
Ms. Johanna SWEDIN, The Swedish National Counsel for Nuclear Waste
Case Study-2: Japan's case (15min+Q&A 7min)
Mr. SHIMOHORI Tomokazu, Director, Radioactive Waste Management Policy Division, Agency for Natural Resources and Energy, Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry
 
17:50 - 17:55 (Break)
   
17:55 - 19:10 Session 4, Stakeholder involvement relating to Nuclear Facilities including power stations -National perspectives (75 min)
Chair: Dr. Lucille V. ABAD, Chief, Atomic Research Division, PNRI
Case Study-3: Australia's case (15min+Q&A 5min)
Mr. Matt PARKER, Utilization Manager, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization (ANSTO)
Case Study-4: Indonesia's case (15min+Q&A 5min)
Dr. Adipurwa MUSLICH, Public Communication Bureau, National Research and Innovation Agency (BRIN)
Case Study-5: Malaysia's case (15min+Q&A 5min)
Mr. Ahsanulkhaliqin B. Abdul WAHAB, Senior Research Officer
Malaysian Nuclear Agency
Case Study-6: Bangladesh's case (10min+Q&A 5min)
Dr. Md. Khurshed ALAM, Director, Scientific Information Division, Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission (BAEC)
   
19:10 - 19:15 Session 5, Closing (5 min)
Closing Remarks: Mr. SANO Toshio, Commissioner of JAEC


 

Forum for Nuclear Cooperation in Asia (FNCA)
“FNCA 2022 Study Panel”
List of Participants

Participants from FNCA countries
Australia

Mr. Matt Parker
Leader Environmental Research
Utilisation Manager, ANSTO

Bangladesh

Dr. Md. Khurshed Alam
Scientific Information Division
Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission (BAEC)

China

Mr. Song Tianhao
Staff, Department of international cooperation
China Atomic Energy Authority (CAEA)

Ms. Hu Chaonan
Project Official
China Atomic Energy Authority (CAEA)

Ms. Wang Shuying
Journalist
The press office of CAEA

Indonesia

Mr. Totti TJIPTOSUMIRAT
Senior Officer (National Liaison Officer for IAEA TC Programme)
Nuclear Energy Research Organization
National Research and Innovation Agency (BRIN)

Dr. Adipurwa Muslich
Staff for Public Communication Bureau
National Research and Innovation Agency (BRIN)

Ms. Theresia Erni Wijayanti
Coordinator of Media Publication
National Research and Innovation Agency (BRIN)

Kazakhstan

Ms. Nurgul Kurmangaliyeva
Head of International Projects Support Group
Department of Scientific Analytical Information and International Cooperation
Branch Institute of Radiation Safety and Ecology (RSE) of National Nuclear Center of Republic of Kazakhstan

Malaysia

Mr. Ahsanulkhaliqin B. Abdul Wahab
Senior Research Officer
Malaysian Nuclear Agency

Mongolia

Mr. Mavag CHADRAABAL
Head of Nuclear Technology Policy Department
Executive Office of Nuclear Energy Commission of Mongolia

Ms. Khulan Chuluunbat
Foreign Affairs Division
Executive Office of Nuclear Energy
Commission of Mongolia

The Philippines

Dr. Vallerie Ann I. Samson
Deputy Director, Department of Science and Technology
Philippine Nuclear Research Institute (PNRI)

Dr. Lucille V. ABAD
Chief, Department of Science and Technology
Philippine Nuclear Research Institute (PNRI)

Ms. Kristine Marie Romallosa
Supervising Science Research Specialist
Department of Science and Technology
Philippine Nuclear Research Institute (PNRI)

Dr. Alvie Asuncion-Astronomo
Associate Scientist
Department of Science and Technology
Philippine Nuclear Research Institute (PNRI)

Mr. Ryan U. Olivares
Supervising Science Research Specialist
Department of Science and Technology
Philippine Nuclear Research Institute (PNRI)

Mr. Jeffrey D. Tare
Senior Science Research Specialist
Department of Science and Technology
Philippine Nuclear Research Institute (PNRI)

Mr. Rafael Miguel M. Dela Cruz
Science Research Analyst
Department of Science and Technology
Philippine Nuclear Research Institute (PNRI)

Thailand

Dr. Kanokrat Tiyapun
Head of Reactor Support and Planning Section
Research Reactor Center
Thailand Institute of Nuclear Technology (TINT)

Vietnam

Dr. Tran Ngoc Toan
Vice President,
Vietnam Atomic Energy Institute (VINATOM)

Ms. CAO Hong Lan
Deputy Director, Department of International Cooperation
Vietnam Atomic Energy Institute (VINATOM)

Ms. NGUYEN Thi Thu Ha
Officer, Department of Planning and Science Management
Vietnam Atomic Energy Institute (VINATOM)

Ms. PHAM Thanh Hương
Officer, Department of International Cooperation
Vietnam Atomic Energy Institute (VINATOM)

Guest Speakers from Overseas

Mr. Greg LAMARRE
Head of the Division of Radiological Protection and Human Aspects of Nuclear Safety
The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA)

Ms. Johanna Swedin
Scientific Secretary, and Web-Editor
The Swedish National Council for Nuclear Waste

■Participants from Japan

Dr. UESAKA Mitsuru
Chairman
Japan Atomic Energy Commission (JAEC)

Mr. SANO Toshio
Commissioner
Japan Atomic Energy Commission (JAEC)

Dr. NAKANISHI M Tomoko
Commissioner
Japan Atomic Energy Commission (JAEC)

Mr. KAKUDO Takafumi
Deputy Director General for Science, Technology and Innovation Policy
Cabinet Office of Japan (CAO)

Mr. SHINDO Kazumi
Director for Atomic Energy and International Affairs
Bureau of Science, Technology and Innovation
Cabinet Office of Japan (CAO)

Ms. KIKUCHI Kumiko
Deputy-Director, Office for Atomic Energy Policy
Secretariat of the Atomic Energy Commission
Cabinet Office of Japan (CAO)

Mr. IWASAKA Katsuhiko
Senior Researcher, Office of Atomic Energy Policy
Secretariat of the Atomic Energy Commission
Cabinet Office, Government of Japan (CAO)

Dr. NAKAE Nobuo
Senior Researcher, Office for Atomic Energy Policy
Secretariat of Atomic Energy Commission
Cabinet Office, Government of Japan (CAO)

Mr. HIRUSAWA Shigenobu
Technical Counsellor, Office of Atomic Energy Policy
Secretariat of the Atomic Energy Commission
Cabinet Office, Government of Japan (CAO)

Mr. FUNABIKI Takahisa
Deputy Director
International Nuclear and Fusion Energy Affairs Division
Research and Development Bureau
Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT)

Ms. TANAKA Fumiyo
Administrative Researcher
International Nuclear and Fusion Energy Affairs Division
Research and Development Bureau
Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT)

Mr. YAMAMOTO Keishi
Researcher
International Nuclear and Fusion Energy Affairs Division
Research and Development Bureau
Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT)

Mr. SHIMOHORI Tomokazu
Director, Radioactive Waste Management Policy Division
Electricity and Gas Industry Department
Agency for Natural Resources and Energy
Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI)

Mr. HORIKAWA Michihiro
Deputy Director
Radioactive Waste Management Policy Division
Electricity and Gas Industry Department
Agency for Natural Resources and Energy
Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI)

Ms. NAGAI Akari
Assistant Director
Radioactive Waste Management Policy Division
Electricity and Gas Industry Department
Agency for Natural Resources and Energy
Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI)

Mr. TOBE Kosuke
Consultant
The Division of Radiological Protection and Human Aspects of Nuclear Safety
The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA)

Mr. WADA Tomoaki
FNCA Coordinator of Japan

Dr. TAMADA Masao
FNCA Advisor of Japan


Forum for Nuclear Cooperation in Asia (FNCA)
“FNCA 2022 Study Panel”
Presentations

Session 2-1 Keynote Speech I 1.4MB
Session 2-2 Keynote Speech II 1.3MB
Session 3-1 Case Study-1 (Sweden) 0.4MB
Session 3-2 Case Study-2 (Japan) 1.2MB
Session 4-1 Case Study-3 (Australia) 1.5MB
Session 4-2 Case Study-4 (Indonesia) 2.7MB
Session 4-3 Case Study-5 (Malaysia) 1.8MB
Session 4-4 Case Study-6 (Bangladesh) 0.2MB


Forum for Nuclear Cooperation in Asia